Why Seniors Struggle With Athlete’s Foot

What’s up with that? Many seniors are still active, but it seems as if they struggle with athlete’s foot more often than those who should be more prone to getting it.

Athlete’s foot is actually common in older adults – and it has little to do with how often they’re in a gym locker room. Seniors are more susceptible to fungal problems because they’re often less capable at keeping their feet clean and dry.

4 Ways to Kick Back at Athlete’s Foot

It doesn’t matter what age we are. Nobody wants to put up with persistent pain and itch. Here are four ways to help seniors deal with athlete’s foot.

  1. It starts with thorough cleaning. They may need help. There are medicated soaps you can purchase that help. You can also purchase liquid soap with tea tree oil. It’s tingly and soothing, and the tea tree oil is a natural substance with antibacterial and antifungal properties.
  2. Help them keep their feet dry. The fungus and bacteria that contribute to athlete’s foot prefers a moist environment – especially between the toes.
  3. There are both medicated creams and aerosol sprays that are highly effective in curing athlete’s foot. These can be purchased over the counter. Apply all over the foot – not just on the soles. Make sure to get between the toes.
  4. It might seem counterintuitive, but it’s a good idea to apply a moisturizer after the medicated cream or spray has been absorbed. This helps promote healing.

More Tips

Socks and shoes can trap moisture, which creates the optimal environment for athlete’s foot. It might be a good idea to switch to wearing open-toe slippers. Look for slippers that have closed backs, so they won’t slip off while walking. Toes and feet get to breathe and stay dry.

Socks might need more than standard wash. Keep athlete’s foot from returning by soaking socks with an anti-fungal disinfectant soap like Pine Sol. The soaking will kill any remaining fungus that’s in the sock fibers. Then, wash as usual. Dry with a high temperature.

All it takes is a small amount of lingering fungus to bring on another round of athlete’s foot. Often, the cause is our shoes. If the fungus can live on a gym shower floor, it’s right at home on the sole of a favorite pair of loafers. The easiest way to clean shoes is to regularly spray the insides with Lysol.

Clean and dry. That’s the approach to athlete’s foot and seniors. If the problem is persistent or extremely painful, it’s time for a visit to a healthcare professional.

Technology Upgrades Residential Senior Care

It’s estimated that one in five adults in the United States now have access to a smart speaker. There are nearly 50 million of these voice-powered devices now in use. Alexa could very well be the most spoken name in the world.

These devices can offer more than quick ways to find out the temperature outside or order something from Amazon. They’re helping seniors and their care providers. Providers like Libertana Home Health and Bayada Home Health Care are using Amazon’s Echo technology to deepen access to medical assistance and use Alexa’s artificial intelligence to be a digital and entertaining friend that can reduce feelings of loneliness.

The pace is accelerating

We’ll see technology continue to interact with seniors and caregivers as manufacturers find more ways to inject artificial intelligence into the home setting. For older adults, this means an increasing ability to maintain independence because of the digital assistants like Alexa and even Apple’s Siri.

We’re already familiar with the term “smart home.” Now we’ll see this technology migrate to help older adults living residential care facilities. There are already shining examples of technology-enabled homes that are focused on helping seniors popping up across the nation. This model home in San Diego is outfitted with an impressive array of technology that encourage greater independence for seniors, as well as helping caregivers with their responsibilities.

It’s a shared goal, and entire innovation centers are opening around the country that are showcasing technology-powered support for older adults. The Thrive Center is a public-private partnership between the Commonwealth of Kentucky and Louisville Metro, as well as companies such as CDW Healthcare, Samsung, Intel, Ergotron, Lenovo and HP/Aruba. Senior health care providers, including Kindred Healthcare and major skilled nursing provider Signature HealthCare are also involved.

Connecting seniors with healthcare professionals

Our desire for digital assistants in the home is extended to the healthcare industry, too. Congress and federal regulatory agencies are working with startups and well-established companies to make telehealth more accessible to seniors. The foundation was put in place to make this happen several years ago with governmental actions such as the 21st Century Cures Act. This legislation calls for ways to help seniors make better use of telehealth opportunities.

We’ve heard about IoT – the Internet of Things – and smart speakers are ushering this digital assistance into residential care homes for seniors to create opportunities for older adults to have richer and more independent lives, while still being connected to safety and instant assistance.

Bed And Seating Aids

You don’t have to be a senior citizen to experience difficulty getting out of bed in the morning. An exercise injury can reward you with a stiff joint, giving you a taste of what might be waiting for you as you get older.

Bed and seating aids help older adults remain independent with daily activities like getting in or out of bed, or sitting in a chair. They make these everyday actions easier and safer.

Useful and Easy

Aging and living with chronic conditions can increase the amount of time we spend at home, which makes it important to make that environment comfortable and safe. Mobility aids, especially in the bedroom, living room, and bathroom, make it easier for older adults to get around independently.

On an average, we spend a third of our lives sleeping. We spend so much time there that it’s important to focus on the needs of older adults for assistance in mobility. Bedroom aids such as a bed rope ladder or a fitted bed rail help older adults rise to a seated position when they awaken. These aids provide safe support with getting on or off the bed.

Bed rails can be easily installed and safely secured. Some can slide out of the way when not in use, while others also act as a protective guard to prevent falling out of bed during sleep. See the FDA Guide on Bedrail safety to help find the most appropriate device for your needs. https://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/HomeHealthandConsumer/ConsumerProducts/BedRailSafety/ucm20038764.htm

For those with greatly reduced body strength, there are also electric profiling beds that greatly reduce the effort. An overbed table might be the solution for those who prefer to read or do other activities in bed.

Help with Sitting and Standing

While there are plenty of aids to help an older adult get in and out of a chair, often one of the most simple and effective solutions is a quality chair cushion. It raises the overall height of the seat, so older adults don’t have as far to lower themselves when sitting – or to rise when standing.

Risers that attach to the legs of furniture are another inexpensive way to adjust the height of a sofa or chair, making it easier for an older adult to be seated or stand. They are typically sold in packages that offer the ability to raise a piece of furniture three to four inches. The bottoms have non-skid pads to protect flooring.

It doesn’t take much to return a sense of independence with these bed and seating aids, and many are relatively inexpensive purchases.

Older Adults And Feeling Cold

It might sound like a stereotype, but medical science won’t argue if you say that many older adults often complain about feeling cold. It’s a fact that as we age, some of us find it harder to tolerate cold, especially in hands and feet.

Increasing sensitivity to told temperatures may be the sign of a medical problem such as diabetes or hypertension. It’s also common for medications like beta blockers prescribed to older adults to decrease the heart rate, which can reduce the circulation to our hands and feet. Calcium channel blockers may be prescribed for seniors living with hypertension. The drug works by relaxing blood vessels, and that can contribute to the feeling of being cold. High blood cholesterol and thyroid conditions can also impact our ability to regulate body temperature. For these reasons, it’s important to consult with a medical professional if an older adult complains about constantly feeling cold. If it’s not related to a health condition, it’s likely just a consequence of age.

Colder than it used to be

Healthy older adults may find that they do actually feel colder than they used to. It’s not psychological. One of the most common reasons is a decrease in circulation. As we age, the walls of our blood vessels lose their elasticity. There’s also a thinning of the fat layer under the skin, which helps to conserve body heat. Both of these can contribute to feeling cold.

Metabolic responses also slow down as we age. Our body has a built-in body temperature regulator. The vasoreceptors responsible for this regulation may not be as quick as they used to at directing the body’s blood vessels to constrict in order to raise our body temperature. 

On top of this, science shows that older adults tend to have slightly colder body temperatures. Most of the time, an older adult who feels cold is in no danger. It’s important to understand that hypothermia is a possibility. Hypothermia is a real threat for older adults, and the condition sets in when body temperatures fall below 95 degrees.

While you might associate hypothermia with freezing conditions, seniors with lower metabolism caused by medications or chronic health conditions can get hypothermia in temperatures as warm as the mid-70s.

Feeling cold all the time is a natural condition and part of aging. Once an underlying medical condition is ruled out, warming up is often as easy as putting on a sweater. Scarves and hats aren’t outdoor fashion accessories for older adults, they’re necessities. A warm drink can help a senior shake a cold spell – but keep in mind that adding alcohol to it actually can trigger heat loss.

Stuck In the Elevator with Gail

 

Our More Interesting Version of ‘Meet the Staff.’

Grace Homes Housing manager

Grace Homes Housing Manager, Gail Hoch

Gail Hoch

Each month we are going to introduce to a member of our office staff.  Instead of the same ole ‘meet the staff’ with a picture and bio we wanted to make it more fun and personal.  Ours is called Stuck in the Elevator with ________.  This month you get to meet the employee who has been here the longest.  She knows this company like the back of her hand and thank goodness because I don’t know where I’d be if I weren’t able to call Gail. We are all a little sad that she isn’t in the office every day as she used to be. She has been made the House Manager of our Residential Care Homes for seniors, Grace Homes. Because of this, she has a new office in our Oakridge Home in Hopkins, MN.  Don’t let this make you think we don’t see her.  We still manage to come up with enough stuff for her to have to come back over to the offices and get us all in line.

She’s the “it girl” of Matrix.  She’s been with Matrix for 22 years.  Her seniority in the company is not what makes her unique, she has earned every bit of her status by being really good at and actually caring about her job and the clients we care for. If you have a question, you go to Gail. I followed Gail for several weeks when I first began, and my head was spinning at all of the things she was taking care of and keeping in order.  She remembers everything and still even to this day, thank goodness,  will remind me of something I am supposed to remember, and for this I am thankful. She doesn’t do it undesirably, it’s more of an older sister has your back kind of way.  Gail has a warmth to her that makes everyone feel comfortable, respected, and appreciated.

Gail earned an Associates in Applied Science degree in Office Administration and Medical Office Assistant degree from the Minnesota School of Business.  She has over 22 years experience working in the office setting.  Prior to accepting the position as Housing Manager at *Grace Homes in July 2018 Gail was the Operations Manager at the Matrix Home Health Care Specialists corporate office managing day to day operations including client intake and management, maintaining and auditing clinical records, maintaining and auditing policies and procedures, part-time staffing, creating and maintaining forms, billing, accounts receivable, and marketing.  In her new position, she is still doing much of the same with managing resident intake and admissions, house tours, resident records, staffing, and billing.

 

 

HOW DID YOU FIND MATRIX?

GH: Job placement program through college.

 

WHAT GETS YOU OUT OF BED IN THE MORNING?

GH: Coffee!!

 

WHAT IS THE MOST RECENT APP YOU DOWNLOADED AND WHY?

GH: Messenger – the facebook app.  I did not have it downloaded yet on my new phone and someone sent me something so I had to download the app to open it.  Nothing exciting, however, the video that was shared was of two elderly women dancing to ‘Watch Me’ (whip/nae nae)… worth the download!

 

WHAT IS SOMETHING FEW PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT YOU?

GH: I’m going to be a grandma!

 

WHO INSPIRES YOU?

GH: Depends on the day – honestly, lots of people.  My children definitely – they inspire me to be a better parent and a better person.

 

WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST FEAR?

GH: Being alone.  Okay… and spiders, centipedes, and generally all creepy – crawly things.

 

WHAT IS SOMETHING YOU LEARNED LAST WEEK?

GH: I was reminded that things are not always what they seem and never judge a book by it’s cover.

 

WHAT THREE WORDS WOULD YOU USE TO DESCRIBE MATRIX?

GH: Compassionate, Experienced, Professional

 

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE  YOUR 13-YEAR-OLD SELF?

GH: Slow down – you don’t have to grow up so fast!

 

WHAT IS SUCCESS TO YOU?

GH: Being able to find the perfect balance in life – still working on it and I will let you know when I find it.

 

AT WHAT AGE DID YOU BECOME AN ADULT?

GH: Hmmm, interesting question… 20 maybe?

 

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT MATRIX?

GH: After 22 years with Matrix, there have been many things through the years that have kept me here- it is a company that has evolved and grown with the times, adapted and overcame.  One thing has not changed is the passion to provide the best care we possibly can and be a company that people want to work for.

 

IF YOU HAD TO EAT ONE MEAL FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE EVERYDAY WHAT WOULD IT BE?

GH: Oh my … just one… I can’t do it!  Does salad, steak, crab legs, spaghetti, lasagna, and cheesecake count as one meal?

 

WHAT IS YOUR MOTTO OR PERSONAL MANTRA?

GH: Finding Balance 🙂

 

WHAT IS AN ABILITY YOU WISH YOU HAD?

GH: Go back in time.

 

YOU ARE THE HAPPIEST WHEN

GH: Spending time with the people I love.

 

WHAT ARE YOUR HOPES FOR THE SENIOR CARE INDUSTRY?

GH: I hope more people find passion in caring for the elderly – it is such an important job!

 

IF YOU COULD MEET ANYONE, LIVING OR DEAD, WHO WOULD IT BE AND WHY?

GH: I can’t think of any one person… I can think of lots of people that would be interesting to meet but no one person in particular.  I know my daughter would really like to meet Tyler and Josh with Twenty One Pilots – so I would want to meet them so she could meet them….(you’re welcome Maddie!)

 

WHAT WAS THE LAST EXPERIENCE THAT HAS MADE YOU A STRONGER PERSON?

GH: Losing a beloved family member has taken tremendous strength and resiliency.

 

That is our second edition of “Stuck in the elevator.”  Next month we will have the Q&A with our RN Keeley Nanry.  Thanks for reading and if you are thinking you might want to be a part of this team check out the details below?

 

To learn more about joining our team and providing compassionate care services:

 

 

  • Apply by submitting an application via fax:  952-525-0506 Attn: HR Manager

 

 

 

Please direct any specific inquiries to Elizabeth, our HR Manager,  by calling 952-525-0505

 

 

“We’re there for you”

Matrix Home Health Care Specialists & Grace Homes

Grace Homes Hires Its Own Culinary Director To Make Mealtimes Great For Seniors

It can be a struggle to find ways to appeal to senior taste buds. Both age and medical conditions can impact their appetites. Many older adults also have special nutritional needs. Grace Homes has solved this challenge by hiring former Houlihan’s restaurant executive kitchen manager Lori Hossli to oversee the planning and preparation of meals at its Hopkins residential care homes.

Hossli is a native Minnesotan who holds a certificate in culinary arts from Le Cordon Bleu. She is well known in the Minneapolis area food world for her 15-year association with popular local eateries such as Kincaids and Houlihan’s.

Hossli’s new position is not the first time she’s worked closely with senior citizens. “After attending college at Winona State University, I joined AmeriCorps Southern Minnesota,” she said. “I had my first true experience working with the elderly affected by Alzheimer’s. I also joined the activity staff at St. Anne’s Hospice and had the opportunity to interact, sing, bake, do crafts, play games, and dance with residents.”

Stepping into the position as culinary director for the residents at Grace Homes makes excellent use of Hossli’s culinary skills and her desire to make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Her extensive experience in meal planning and training will help Grace Homes residents work through the challenges associated with age and eating healthy.

“Food often tastes different for seniors than it does for you and me,” Hossli explains. “Our sense of taste and smell can change with age, and the side effects from medications can alter our senses. There are plenty of ways to make food both healthy and delicious for seniors. That’s what’s on the menu for the residents at Grace Homes.”

Hossli will work out of the Oak Ridge location and will oversee meal planning and preparation for the Hopkins senior residential care locations. The Oak Ridge location is an eight-bedroom home located in a private residential neighborhood in Hopkins. Grace Homes also has a five-bedroom residential home located just next door. Grace Homes recently added a third location, which is the five-bedroom Walnut Lodge located in Burnsville.

About Grace Homes: Grace Homes currently owns and operates three senior residential care homes. Each is located in private neighborhood settings. Grace Homes’ elevated level of staffing allows for the accommodation of residents with Parkinson’s, COPD, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, cognitive challenges or dementia, chronic healthcare challenges, and persons with disabilities including those who require a two-person transfer or mechanical lift. Grace Homes focuses on providing a safe, familiar, and stimulating family home environment for residents living with memory loss and cognitive decline.