What is Person-Centered Care and How To Distinguish It

I think it was my 2nd staff meeting, during the section where we are getting updates on each client ’s care and their well-being I heard someone say person-centered care. I perked up because I wasn’t sure what they were talking about but I could tell that I was going to like it. I asked them to back up and explain to me what person-centered care meant. After they explained that person-centered care is at the center of all that we do at Matrix and is the core of every resident plan of care. Person-centered care means, everything we do for the client is based upon THEIR specific needs, desires and is what best fits them, not us.

 

Core Characteristics of Person-Centered Care are:

  • Resecting and Valuing the individual as a full member of society
  • Providing individualized emotional and physical spaces for care that are in tune with people’s changing needs
  • Understanding the perspective of the person in all care and activities
  • Providing supportive opportunities for social engagement to help people live their life and experience well-being.

 

Going over this material brought a quote to mind, so I looked it up and found out who said it. I think it describes the essence of person-centered care.

 

“A good physician treats the disease; a great physician treats the patient who has the disease.” – Sir William Osler

 

It is more than knowing how to care for someone who has a specific illness. Understanding the person and the context of their illness. It is taking into consideration the whole story. Each and every one of us is more than a specific illness or disease and what is right for one of us may not be what is right for the other. Understanding this is person-centered care.

Person-Centered Care Language

When speaking to our clients or residents caregivers need to be mindful of the terms used not to be dehumanizing. Here are some examples:

 

 

Here is a chart that makes it easy to discern what type of care you or your loved one is receiving.

 

 

Is person-centered care the norm?

The answer no but on a more positive note, it is becoming more available. Even though the term is relatively new in the industry, it embodies a way of thinking and a value system that is as old as humanity, even if it is not the most common practice. It is simply about doing things with people and not to them.

We here at Matrix/grace homes are dedicated to creating environments that become places where elders can continue to live and, most importantly, make their own choices and have control over their daily lives. This kind of care not only enhances the quality of lives of our residents or clients but also for our staff. It promotes a more intimate, empathetic approach that overall increases a sense of community and spirit of love for everyone involved.

 

To learn more about joining our team and providing compassionate care services:

 

  • Visit the employment page of our website www.matrixhomehealthmn.com
  • Apply by submitting an application via fax: 952-525-0506 Attn: HR Manage
  • via email: eengeldinger@matrixhomehealthmn.com
  • use this link http://bit.ly/work4matrix
  • Please direct any specific inquiries to Elizabeth, our HR Manager, by calling 952-525-0505

 

“We’re There For You.”

MATRIX HOME HEALTH CARE SPECIALISTS + GRACE HOMES

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How to Help Prevent Elder Fraud

What is elder fraud? It’s when unscrupulous people take advantage of senior citizens. It affects nearly 40% of those of us over the age of 65, and the loss is over $36 billion annually.

How does it occur? Some of it is going on right under your nose. It includes things that don’t necessarily have to be confusing for seniors, such as misleading financial advice, hidden fees or subscriptions, or even fake dietary products. Here are a few things you need to know.

The 3 Main Types of Elder Fraud

  1. The largest type of fraud is financial exploitation. It’s the cause of nearly $17 billion in annual losses to seniors. Much of this comes as junk mail or unsolicited telemarketing. Scammers defraud seniors by getting consent to take their money.
  2. Seniors lose another $13 billion because of criminal fraud. At the top of the list is identity theft.
  3. Tragically, caregiver abuse contributes another $7 billion in annual losses to seniors. This is not physical abuse. It’s when a trusted person uses their relationship with a senior to inappropriately use finances or even outright steal money.

Who’s Most at Risk?

You might think that seniors with memory issues are the biggest victims of elder fraud. Statistics may surprise you.

  • Studies have shown that thrifty seniors are 5 times more likely to be at risk because they’re attracted by the bargains that get pitched to them by scammers.
  • Ironically, extremely friendly and sociable seniors are 4 times more likely to be defrauded. Experts believe this is because they’re more approachable and tend to give strangers the benefit of a doubt.
  • Even financially sophisticated seniors are at risk. Experts have discovered these seniors tend to lose more due to fraud because they’re comfortable with larger amounts of money.
  • Seniors who receive one or more telemarketing phone calls a day are 3 times more likely to experience a financial loss due to fraud than someone who only gets an occasional telemarketing phone call.

Prevention

The easiest way to keep elder fraud at bay is to check on a senior’s financial situation regularly. There are enough scams to worry about already, but it’ll be in your best interests to start paying attention to those that are particularly aimed at seniors.

You can cut down on telemarketing and potential scams by helping seniors sign up for the National Do Not Call registry. It’s a free service provided by the Federal Trade Commission. You can register online or call 888-382-1222.

Balance Exercises for Seniors

More than 2 million older Americans end up at the emergency room because of fall-related injuries every year. There are many related causes, but the majority is because seniors just don’t get enough exercise.

Regular exercise is a crucial part of maintaining health and mobility for older adults—especially those who are in memory care homes. Balance exercises are especially important because they can help to prevent falls. Here are two exercises that caregivers can help seniors perform. They’re simple, and they require no complicated or expensive equipment.

1. Standing on One Foot

Either you or a sturdy chair that’s not on wheels will be the only assistance required for this exercise. Have the person stand behind the chair, or extend your arm and tell them to hold on to it.

Then, have them raise one of their legs off the ground. The easiest way is to ask them to bend their knee, so that their foot comes up behind them. It only has to be a few inches off the ground. The objective is to have them standing only on one foot.

Ask them to hold this position for 10 seconds. Tell them it’s fine if they want to rest their hand on the hip of the raised leg. This might assist in their feeling of a comfortable balance. Be sure to watch for their stability, and be ready to assist them if they start to fall. Ask them to repeat this motion 10 times, and then switch to the other leg.

It might seem as if this isn’t even really an exercise. It’s helping the participant to utilize the muscles in their standing leg and back. They’ll be focused on keeping their balance, and that’s what you want to help them retain.

2. Heel-to-Toe Walk

Your exercise partner might not even believe that this is an exercise—and that’s one of the benefits. Have them do this exercise near a wall, or assure them that you’ll be right next to them to offer a steady arm.

Have them position the heel of one foot directly in front of the toes of the other foot. This will work best if they actually have the heel of the front foot touching the toes of the trailing foot. Then tell them to take the back foot and place it in front of the front foot. Make sure they’re not looking down at their feet. Ask them to focus on a spot directly in front of them.

Speed isn’t what you’re after here. You want to help your exercise partner maintain a slow and steady movement as they concentrate on placing one foot in front of the other, taking about 20 or so steps. The exercise helps them think about foot placement and balance.

These two exercises help seniors to maintain—or even regain—their sense of balance. It allows them to feel surer of themselves as they move about. A better sense of balance can help to prevent fall-related injuries by building strength, flexibility, and endurance. Best of all, they don’t even really seem like exercises!

Understanding Sundowning

It’s not depression. It’s not a disease, either. Sundowning is actually a group of symptoms. In combination, they often mimic depression—and it’s also easy to think of it as a manifestation of dementia. Especially when studies report that 1 in 5 seniors with Alzheimer’s disease experience increased depression, agitation, and confusion toward the end of the day.

More study is needed. The exact cause of sundowning still isn’t known—but there are factors which contribute to it that can be controlled.

Reduced Light

Vision becomes even more challenging for the elderly as the sun’s natural light fades. Many are already challenged with impaired vision. Shadows and decreased lighting can cause confusion and fear in seniors with dementia.

Gerontologists also postulate that dementia alters the part of the brain that controls the need for sleep. The reduced light may also cause unintended disturbances to their biological clock, making difficult to separate dreams from reality, as they’re no longer sure when to sleep or be awake.

Fatigue

The setting sun often coincides with a culmination of physical and mental exhaustion for a senior. The rapid mood changes and uncooperativeness some seniors express may actually be frustrated reactions to the wear and tear of the day—which is also something that caregivers are feeling.

This last point is worth examining further. Sundowning often happens during a point of increased activity in a senior living facility. It’s usually when there’s a shift change. The increased activity and pace of people coming and going may be unsettling for some seniors.

Ways to Lessen the Potential Causes

If you’re aware of the possible triggers of sundowning, you can help to lessen its impact. Routine and activities have been shown to help. Keep seniors who show signs of sundowning on a consistent schedule of sleeping and eating. Plan regular activities for them throughout the day—especially things that get them outside and into the sunlight.

Remove stimulants from their diet if possible. Move caffeine and sugar intake to the start of the day so it won’t amplify the things that contribute to sundowning later in the day. Stimulation isn’t always a bad thing. Use it to build familiarity. Music often helps when seniors show signs of sundowning.

Finally, pay close attention to lighting. The objective isn’t to keep the night at bay. Poor lighting, however makes environments feel unfamiliar. That can be extremely stressful. It’s also important to remember that a senior exhibiting the symptoms of sundowning has not willfully chosen to act that way. Your actions often will determine their reactions.