More Than Memory Care

Until recently, Grace Homes specialized in memory care. It’s a distinct form of assisted living care that specifically caters to people living with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, or other types of memory problems. Our group of residences and staff were geared to focus on this area.

But the world of residential senior care homes is changing. The transformation comes in response to the way society views assisted living today – which is no longer only for the elderly. Today, Grace Homes is proud to be able to provide a living environment capable of caring for all types of health conditions, as well as a wider age range for residents.

Healthy Connections

There’s growing research showing the physical and emotional benefits of intergenerational living. Studies by the national Institute on Aging indicate that older adults who experience social isolation experience a variety of mental and physical disorders

Both large senior care organizations, as well as smaller residential senior care homes such as those operated by Grace Homes, are seeing the benefits of welcoming new residents who are sometimes only in their 30s to 50s. To do this, we must expand the type of care we offer.

That’s precisely what we’ve done. Today, Grace Homes is able to provide for all types of chronic illnesses and disabilities, instead of specializing only in memory care. New residents living with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, Parkinson’s, and other disabilities can be accommodated. As a result of this greatly expanded type of care, the existing residents are being joined by new – and sometimes younger – ones.

Residents and their visitors, as well as caretakers, have noticed a growing change. It was always comforting and welcoming. Residents developed deep bonds and friendships. The intergenerational camaraderie has created an even deeper sense of family in the homes.

A Growing Trend

Grace Homes is not alone in moving in this direction. Already there are hundreds of intergenerational day care facilities which have opened for business throughout the United States. There’s also a growing movement by retirement communities and organizations to forge ties with nearby preschools, high schools, or colleges. The connections encourage regular exchanges between people of different ages.

The trend goes beyond America. Similar programs have already been set up in the Netherlands and France.

Recognized by the State of Minnesota

Grace Homes now participates with the elderly waiver program administered by the Minnesota Department of Human Services, which is for people over the age of 65. The trio of care homes also participates with the Minnesota’s Community Access for Disability Inclusion (CADI) program, which is for people who are under the age of 65.

It started with memory care, but the future for Grace Homes is simply care.

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