What is Person-Centered Care and How To Distinguish It

I think it was my 2nd staff meeting, during the section where we are getting updates on each client ’s care and their well-being I heard someone say person-centered care. I perked up because I wasn’t sure what they were talking about but I could tell that I was going to like it. I asked them to back up and explain to me what person-centered care meant. After they explained that person-centered care is at the center of all that we do at Matrix and is the core of every resident plan of care. Person-centered care means, everything we do for the client is based upon THEIR specific needs, desires and is what best fits them, not us.

 

Core Characteristics of Person-Centered Care are:

  • Resecting and Valuing the individual as a full member of society
  • Providing individualized emotional and physical spaces for care that are in tune with people’s changing needs
  • Understanding the perspective of the person in all care and activities
  • Providing supportive opportunities for social engagement to help people live their life and experience well-being.

 

Going over this material brought a quote to mind, so I looked it up and found out who said it. I think it describes the essence of person-centered care.

 

“A good physician treats the disease; a great physician treats the patient who has the disease.” – Sir William Osler

 

It is more than knowing how to care for someone who has a specific illness. Understanding the person and the context of their illness. It is taking into consideration the whole story. Each and every one of us is more than a specific illness or disease and what is right for one of us may not be what is right for the other. Understanding this is person-centered care.

Person-Centered Care Language

When speaking to our clients or residents caregivers need to be mindful of the terms used not to be dehumanizing. Here are some examples:

 

 

Here is a chart that makes it easy to discern what type of care you or your loved one is receiving.

 

 

Is person-centered care the norm?

The answer no but on a more positive note, it is becoming more available. Even though the term is relatively new in the industry, it embodies a way of thinking and a value system that is as old as humanity, even if it is not the most common practice. It is simply about doing things with people and not to them.

We here at Matrix/grace homes are dedicated to creating environments that become places where elders can continue to live and, most importantly, make their own choices and have control over their daily lives. This kind of care not only enhances the quality of lives of our residents or clients but also for our staff. It promotes a more intimate, empathetic approach that overall increases a sense of community and spirit of love for everyone involved.

 

To learn more about joining our team and providing compassionate care services:

 

  • Visit the employment page of our website www.matrixhomehealthmn.com
  • Apply by submitting an application via fax: 952-525-0506 Attn: HR Manage
  • via email: eengeldinger@matrixhomehealthmn.com
  • use this link http://bit.ly/work4matrix
  • Please direct any specific inquiries to Elizabeth, our HR Manager, by calling 952-525-0505

 

“We’re There For You.”

MATRIX HOME HEALTH CARE SPECIALISTS + GRACE HOMES

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Caring For You in Your Home or One of Ours.

Offering supportive care you need in an environment you prefer.

Home care services are on the rise now that the 75 million baby boomers are coming of age.

There are 4 million people retiring each year, about 10,000 a day!

After retiring nothing is more appealing than getting to stay in the comfort of your own home that you have worked so hard for and now have the chance to enjoy.

If continuing to live at home gets put in jeopardy due to declining in health and wellbeing we can help. Matrix will do everything possible to keep you or your loved one comfortably in your home for as long as possible with the help of our skilled and compassionate caregivers.

Sometimes things change beyond our control and decisions have to be made quickly regarding living arrangements; this doesn’t have to require rash decisions made in fear and haste. There is the option of moving into one of our residential care homes and continuing to be under the same compassionate care you have grown accustomed to.

What Is A Residential Care Home?

Let me introduce you to Grace Homes our residential care homes for seniors. Regular homes in quiet neighborhoods that offer 24/7 care provided by healthcare professionals and support staff who are specially trained to manage the unique needs of residents living with memory loss and cognitive decline. We focus on providing a safe, familiar and stimulating family home environment. This is not a nursing home.  It is a real home with nursing.

If you dread the thought of a nursing home and would like an alternative…

We invite you to tour one of our residential care homes and see if this is the aging solution that fits you.  With three lovely residential care homes, we offer our clients a more comfortable choice than the average trajectory of care which would usually place them in a nursing home.

“Our residential care homes provide expert, comprehensive care in a home-like environment with assisted living services that allow our residents to enjoy activities and independence, with the comfort of knowing on-site health care and personal assistance is there when they need it through the end of life.”

Grace Homes Residential Care Homes for Seniors Locations:

WALNUT LODGE: 13708 Portland Ave S, Burnsville MN 55337

WILSHIRE WALK:  414 Wilshire Walk, Hopkins MN 55305

OAK RIDGE:  601 Oak Ridge Road, Hopkins MN 55305

 

Hiring The Right Caregivers

The considerate and thoughtful hiring of our caregivers makes all the difference in how the quality of care is given either in the home or at one of our residential care homes.  We pride ourselves on our ability to find caregivers who do have the traits we strive for. The top 5 traits we look for are PATIENCECOMPASSIONATTENTIVENESSDEPENDABILITY, and TRUSTWORTHINESS. Once a caregiver completes our orientation and training they are already on a path to success before stepping into a client’s home.

To ensure we provide the care our clients can count on, all Matrix employees are carefully screened and fully trained to meet or exceed state requirements.

Matrix Home Health Care Specialists is a Minnesota licensed, comprehensive home health care agency.

We provide home health assistance to elderly and disabled adults who live at home or in a supportive care setting.

Our Services Include:

• In-Home Health Care
• Residential Care Homes
• Care Management
• End-Of-Life Care

These Services Are Provided By:

• Health Aides
• Certified Nursing Assistants
• Licensed Practical Nurses
• Registered Nurses

We are not a franchise but a privately owned agency, Matrix and Grace Homes is run by a Nationally Certified Gerontological Nurse and Certified Case Manager. Available care options range from 4 hours once a month to full-time, 24/7 care.

What Makes Our Health Care Agency Special

• Matrix uses a team-oriented approach to foster the best experience for our clients. To do so, we minimize the number of caregivers in the home to focus on personalized care.

• Our RN Care Managers also supervise home caregivers closely and develop individual Plans of Care for our clients.

• Matrix recognizes the importance of a caring, positive workplace. For five years running, we have been recognized as a Star Tribune Top Workplace, voted by our team members in an anonymous survey administered by Energage.

• We also offer opportunities to complete continuing education requirements for our team members. These continuing education credits include online webinars, coaching, personal instruction and annual group in-services and are paid for by our agency.

“We’re there for you”
Matrix Home Health Care Specialists & Grace Homes.

 
 

Why Preparing For A Hospital Discharge Is Key To Ongoing Recovery

Sure, it’s a reason to celebrate when you get the news that you’re being discharged from the hospital. But, there are important steps seniors should take if they want to stay out and get better. A recent Medicare survey shows that 18% of patients over the age of 65 discharged from a hospital are readmitted within the next 30 days. 

Preparing for a successful hospital discharge can reduce the possibility of this, and much of it can happen before even leaving the hospital. Here’s what you need to know.

What a Discharge Means

We tend to think of this as an end state, but really, it’s more of a continuation. When you’re discharged from the hospital, it simply means that your doctor has determined that you’ve recovered enough to no longer need hospital-level care. It does not mean that you are fully recovered.

In many cases—especially with older adults—it means you may still need extra or specialized care. You may need this for weeks or even months to come.

Participating in the Hospital Discharge

Your physician and a hospital discharge nurse determine when you can leave the hospital. It’s not an accusation, but rather an observation. These professionals are extremely busy. It’s not that they are unwilling to spend enough time with you to make sure you understand everything you need to know about post-hospital recovery. They often assume that you are aware of what’s necessary.

This is why it’s important for both caretakers and senior patients themselves to be advocates in the process. Make sure you have all the necessary information you need—and that all of your concerns have been answered—before you leave the hospital.

To help you with this Medicare has created an extremely helpful hospital discharge checklist. Download it here. This checklist is an important tool because it provides you with the key questions to ask about follow-up care, medication, equipment and supplies, and even problems to watch for. These are all questions you must have satisfactory answers for before a senior patient leaves the hospital.

And, you really do want to get this information prior to discharge. It can be much more difficult to get helpful answers afterwards.

The discharge checklist helps both caregivers and senior patients understand what’s necessary for a successful recovery. It’s a partnership between caregiver and patient. Think of it as a handoff. The medical professionals at the hospital have started the process that gets you back to wellness. Now, it’s your turn to keep the process going.

How to Help Prevent Elder Fraud

What is elder fraud? It’s when unscrupulous people take advantage of senior citizens. It affects nearly 40% of those of us over the age of 65, and the loss is over $36 billion annually.

How does it occur? Some of it is going on right under your nose. It includes things that don’t necessarily have to be confusing for seniors, such as misleading financial advice, hidden fees or subscriptions, or even fake dietary products. Here are a few things you need to know.

The 3 Main Types of Elder Fraud

  1. The largest type of fraud is financial exploitation. It’s the cause of nearly $17 billion in annual losses to seniors. Much of this comes as junk mail or unsolicited telemarketing. Scammers defraud seniors by getting consent to take their money.
  2. Seniors lose another $13 billion because of criminal fraud. At the top of the list is identity theft.
  3. Tragically, caregiver abuse contributes another $7 billion in annual losses to seniors. This is not physical abuse. It’s when a trusted person uses their relationship with a senior to inappropriately use finances or even outright steal money.

Who’s Most at Risk?

You might think that seniors with memory issues are the biggest victims of elder fraud. Statistics may surprise you.

  • Studies have shown that thrifty seniors are 5 times more likely to be at risk because they’re attracted by the bargains that get pitched to them by scammers.
  • Ironically, extremely friendly and sociable seniors are 4 times more likely to be defrauded. Experts believe this is because they’re more approachable and tend to give strangers the benefit of a doubt.
  • Even financially sophisticated seniors are at risk. Experts have discovered these seniors tend to lose more due to fraud because they’re comfortable with larger amounts of money.
  • Seniors who receive one or more telemarketing phone calls a day are 3 times more likely to experience a financial loss due to fraud than someone who only gets an occasional telemarketing phone call.

Prevention

The easiest way to keep elder fraud at bay is to check on a senior’s financial situation regularly. There are enough scams to worry about already, but it’ll be in your best interests to start paying attention to those that are particularly aimed at seniors.

You can cut down on telemarketing and potential scams by helping seniors sign up for the National Do Not Call registry. It’s a free service provided by the Federal Trade Commission. You can register online or call 888-382-1222.

Take As Prescribed: Why Seniors Fail To Follow Medication Schedules

It’s not just seniors. The New York Times reports that at least half of the medications for chronic diseases simply aren’t taken as prescribed. That’s a serious issue for a person of any age, but it can have even worse consequences for seniors. It’s estimated that 10% of hospitalizations for seniors happen annually because of missing medication doses.

Here are the three main reasons why seniors decide not to take medication prescribed to them, and suggestions on what to do about it.

1. They have difficulty understanding the cost

Not all prescription medications are expensive, but much of it is. Many seniors know that they are on a fixed and limited income, and sometimes they decide it’s a better idea to take less than what has been prescribed.

While it may make the prescription last longer, it can make the benefits of the medicine far less effective—or even totally ineffective. If it’s possible, find out whether this is why a senior is skipping taking their medications. It may be necessary to have a frank discussion with them, reminding them that they’re really not saving money. It will cost far more in hospital or medical bills if their condition is not kept in check.

2. They don’t believe there’s any benefit

Serious health conditions like a heart attack or kidney failure often have a long recovery period. During that time, it may not seem as if the daily medications prescribed are doing anything at all. Seniors may start to lose faith that they indeed will get better. Even worse, taking regular medications is a daily reminder that they are not well.

Keep an ongoing dialog with seniors about the medications they’re taking. Remind them that the medicine works best with a healthy diet and lifestyle changes. Point out improvements you see, which they may not. This can help to associate taking the medication with gradual health improvements.

3. They think there’s no longer any reason to take it

Sometimes it seems like a waste of time—and money—to take a medication if you’re feeling better. That’s always a decision best left to a health professional. Often, medications must continue to be taken even after a senior recovers from a health crisis.

No one is likely to appreciate hearing that they’ll have to take a daily medication for the rest of their lives. Seniors may exercise curiosity and decide to stop taking a medication to see if it changes the way they’re feeling. And, they probably will continue to feel fine for the short term.

The problem with this false sense of wellbeing is that they won’t really be able to determine whether drugs that treat conditions like heart disease or high blood pressure are working or not. Many health conditions in the elderly have few or no noticeable symptoms.

The most important thing to remember as a caregiver is that most seniors do not purposely skip medications with the intention of harming themselves. Many times, they simply need a reminder or reassurance that it the medication really is good for them, regardless of what they can or can’t feel.

Heart Failure In Seniors: Know The Signs

The American Heart Association reports that nearly 6 million Americans have some form of heart disease. It’s one of the top reasons why people over the age of 65 are taken to the hospital.

While it’s important that a medical professional make the diagnosis, there are signs to look for if you suspect that someone under your care may be experiencing heart failure.

Start With the Definition

Heart failure is the term used to describe a condition. It means that the heart is weakened and is not pumping blood as well as it should. When the heart can’t do its job, our kidneys cause the body to retain salt and water. Fluid builds up and our body becomes congested. This becomes known as congestive heart failure.

Heart failure in seniors causes shortness of breath, fatigue, and coughing.

Common Symptoms

Heart failure is usually diagnosed because someone experiences more than one of the following symptoms:

  • Shortness of breath. Pay attention of a senior complains of difficulty breathing while they’re lying flat.
  • Persistent wheezing or coughing. Pay attention if this coughing produces pink or white mucus.
  • Edema. Pay attention if a senior complains of swelling in their feet, ankles, legs, or abdomen.
  • Fatigue. Pay attention if a senior tells you they’re feeling tired all the time, or if they’re suddenly feeling fatigued by everyday activities like walking.
  • Appetite changes. Pay attention if a senior tells you they feel nauseated, or if they lose their appetite.
  • Impaired thinking. Pay attention if a senior suddenly appears to be confused—especially if it’s accompanied by memory loss.
  • Increased heart rate. Pay attention if a senior tells you they feel as if their heart is throbbing or racing.

We all have days when we just don’t feel right, so it’s usually nothing to be concerned about if a senior tells you they’re experiencing one of these symptoms. They’re all signs of possible heart failure, but each can be caused by many other things.

On the other hand, if you notice multiple symptoms, it’s wise to seek out a medical professional. Heart failure is a serious condition. There’s often no cure, but heart failure in seniors can be treated and managed with medications.